Iris

Kollam Tourism

  • AttractionsBackwaters, Beach
  • Best SeasonSeptember to March
  • Ideal Duration2 DaysDays
  • LanguagesMalayalam

Kollam (Quilon) is considered as the the gateway to the backwaters of Kerala, extending from Kollam to Alleppy & Furthur. An old saying in Kerala is "kollam kandavanillam venda"- means the spectator gets mesmerized by the glamour of the town that he doesn’t returns to his home. Kollam offers a variety of activities & spots.The town edges with the famous Ashtamudi lake. Many a foreign traveler has visited Kollam in early medieval period. It was one of the early centres of Christian activity in Kerala.

 

It is said that the present town of Kollam was built by the Syrian Merchant; Sapir Iso, in the 9th Century A.D. The popularity of Kollam has been established by the time honoured proverb once you see Kollam, you will not need home any more. Kollam is an important commercial, industrial and trading centreKollam (Quilon) is considered as the the gateway to the backwaters of Kerala, extending from Kollam to Alleppy & Furthur.

 

Kollam offers a variety of activities & spots.The town edges with the famous Ashtamudi lake. Many a foreign traveler has visited Kollam in early medieval period. It was one of the early centres of Christian activity in Kerala. It is said that the present town of Kollam was built by the Syrian Merchant; Sapir Iso, in the 9th Century A.D. The popularity of Kollam has been established by the time honoured proverb once you see Kollam, you will not need home any more. Kollam is an important commercial, industrial and trading centreKollam (Quilon) is considered as the the gateway to the backwaters of Kerala, extending from Kollam to Alleppy & Furthur.

 

Best Time To Kollam

Plan your trip during best season to experience the best of this stunning destination

  • JAN
  • FEB
  • MAR
  • APR
  • MAY
  • JUN
  • JUL
  • AUG
  • SEP
  • OCT
  • NOV
  • DEC

How to reach Kollam

A port city of primary historical importance, Kollam has been on the global map for millennia. This ancient trading town is one of the oldest ports on the Arabian Sea.  Phoenician, Roman, Chinese, Arabic, and later on, Portuguese, Dutch and British traders have been known to frequent this thriving harbour, seeking to get a share in the flourishing spice and cashew nut trade. Its location, along the east-west trading routes and at the head of canals linking back to Kochi and Alleppey, was also an essential element in its evolution into a major Indian port.

If you’re feeling daring and splurgy, Kollam has its own helipad, ready to receive you at a moment’s notice!

Trains are the best way to travel around Kerala, and India in general, as they are highly affordable but more comfortable than buses, and the rail networks are extensive. You can purchase your tickets online or in-person at the station booths, and enjoy a relaxing, scenic journey.

Distance By Air By Road By Train
By Flight

The nearest airport is Trivandrum International Airport, with flights connecting to major domestic cities like Mumbai, Hyderabad, Chennai, Delhi, Bangalore and Kochi, and Sharjah, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Bahrain, Kuwait, Muscat, Malé, Doha, Singapore and Colombo internationally. From Trivandrum, you can travel by taxi, bus or train to your final destination.

By Train

Kollam Junction is an important railway station in Kerala, with routes connecting to Ernakulam Junction (Trivandrum), Alleppey, Kanyakumari and Kottayam. Trains services are frequent and regular, as well as economic and comfortable. From the train station, a pre-paid auto-rickshaw service is available!

By Bus

State-owned and local buses frequently travel to Kollam from most major cities, but buses are likely to be crowded and uncomfortable. If you’re travelling with lots of luggage or are uncomfortable at close quarters, coaches are not the way to go.

Mayyanad

Mayyanad located at 10 Km from Kollam Town is noted for its shrines and temples. The most important of the nine temples here is the Subramanya Temple at Umayanallor. The shrine is said to have been consecrated by the great Hindu philosopher Sree Sankaracharya.

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Sasthamkotta Backwaters

This vast fresh water lake surrounded by hills on three sides is the largest of its kind in Kerala and is located at 29 Km from Kollam Town. The ancient Sastha Temple which lends its name to the town, is an important pilgrim centre near Shasthamkotta Backwaters.

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Thenmala Eco Tourism

Thenmala is home to India's first planned eco-tourism project. It has equal opportunities for fun, adventure, leisure and for learning the significance and necessity of eco-friendly measures for promoting tourism related activities.

 

Thenmala Ecotourism in Kollam  was selected by the World Tourism Organisation as a premier eco-friendly project and is India's first planned Ecotourism destination.  In Malayalam "Then" means honey and "Mala" means hillock i.e. hon

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Palaruvi Waterfalls

Palaruvi which means "stream of milk" makes its way down the rocks, from a height of 300 feet. The Palaruvi woods is a beautiful picnic spot located at a distance of 75 KMsfrom Kollam Town.

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Jatayu Park

A vast rocky area and a small temple on the top of the rock is Jadayu Para. This place is located at Chadayamangalam at a distance of 30 Kms from Kollam Town.

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Thangassery Light House

The Dutch Quilon as it was called used to be a British Enclave. The place is also popular as Thangasseri. The lighthouse built at Quilon by the British in the year 1902 is visible as far as 13 miles in the sea.

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Ashtamudi Backwaters

So called because of its 8 arms or channels, Ashtamudi Lake is the gateway to the backwaters. Located in Kollam District, this lake 16 km long and the second largest in Kerala, finds its way into the sea through the Neendakara estuary.

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A port city of primary historical importance, Kollam has been on the global map for millennia. This ancient trading town is one of the oldest ports on the Arabian Sea.  Phoenician, Roman, Chinese, Arabic, and later on, Portuguese, Dutch and British traders have been known to frequent this thriving harbour, seeking to get a share in the flourishing spice and cashew nut trade. Its location, along the east-west trading routes and at the head of canals linking back to Kochi and Alleppey, was also an essential element in its evolution into a major Indian port.

Today, the city centre is a hectic and bustling hive of activity, and the port is still a hub of international commerce. The bazaar is a tumultuous amalgamation of sensory stimulations, with spices, foods, fabrics and souvenirs clamouring for your attention.

If the hustle and bustle become too much for you, Kollam is surrounded by the serene waterways of Ashtamudi Lake. Here, a tranquil tapestry of canals, cashew plantations, rural villages and paddy fields opens up before your eyes. Glide along the waters in an elegant and traditional houseboat (avoiding the higher prices and larger crowds at Alleppey) and soak in the languid backwater ambience. Conversely, enjoy a leisurely picnic at Palaruvi Falls. This three-hundred-foot fall is said to have Ayurvedic properties.

A bit further afield, Munroe Island, or Mundrothuruthu, is an inland cluster of eight islets famous for coir retting and weaving

Kollam Photos

Kollam city itself is awash with temples and sites of cultural significance, many of which are beautifully decorated and celebrate festivals throughout the year. Thangassery Lighthouse is also worth a visit: this one-hundred-and-twenty-year-old structure is the tallest lighthouse in Kerala and has a breathtaking view of the Arabian Sea’s coastline.

The star of the show is Kollam Beach. This famous beach is also known as Mahatma Gandhi Beach and is the first ‘Beach Wedding Destination’ in Kerala. Dotted with the atmospheric ruins of Dutch and Portuguese trading forts, eighteenth-century churches and the beautiful Mahatma Gandhi Park, Kollam beach is a truly unique destination. Traditional Chinese fishing nets, Chinese water pots and sampan-like boats still ply the waves to this day, making Kollam beach a spiritual and cultural coastal haven.

Kollam Tourist Map

Here is a Tourist Destination Map of Kollam with complete information about Kollam travel.Download the Kollam Tourist Map of Kollam tourist destinations on map and plan your tour to Kollam.

A port city of primary historical importance, Kollam has been on the global map for millennia. This ancient trading town is one of the oldest ports on the Arabian Sea.  Phoenician, Roman, Chinese, Arabic, and later on, Portuguese, Dutch and British traders have been known to frequent this thriving harbour, seeking to get a share in the flourishing spice and cashew nut trade. Its location, along the east-west trading routes and at the head of canals linking back to Kochi and Alleppey, was also an essential element in its evolution into a major Indian port.

Today, the city centre is a hectic and bustling hive of activity, and the port is still a hub of international commerce. The bazaar is a tumultuous amalgamation of sensory stimulations, with spices, foods, fabrics and souvenirs clamouring for your attention.

If the hustle and bustle become too much for you, Kollam is surrounded by the serene waterways of Ashtamudi Lake. Here, a tranquil tapestry of canals, cashew plantations, rural villages and paddy fields opens up before your eyes. Glide along the waters in an elegant and traditional houseboat (avoiding the higher prices and larger crowds at Alleppey) and soak in the languid backwater ambience. Conversely, enjoy a leisurely picnic at Palaruvi Falls. This three-hundred-foot fall is said to have Ayurvedic properties.

A bit further afield, Munroe Island, or Mundrothuruthu, is an inland cluster of eight islets famous for coir retting and weaving

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